DessertMirabeau WinesPies & TartsProvencal RecipesTaste: Food & Drink

A Twist on a Classic Recipe Apricot Pistachio Tarte Tartin

Recently, the team at Mirabeau Wine was joined by a Hamilton-based Canadian chef Jake Laderoute, for some fun culinary experiences in Cotignac.

A tarte tatin is a classic French dessert, that one might shy away from making because it looks complicated.

It’s not.

Here, is what Jake and Jeany had to say about this Apricot and Pistachio Tarte Tartin. It is quick and easy dessert to round off a perfectly Provençal meal, the tangy sweetness of the apricots is a lovely antidote to the richly astringent thyme flavour. Sounds odd I know, but it works beautifully.

Apricot Pistachio Tarte Tartin Mirabeau Wine
Apricot and Pistachio Tarte Tartin
Print Recipe
This apricot tarte tatin is not only beautiful it is easy to make.
Servings Prep Time
6-8 people 10 minutes
Cook Time
30-35 minutes
Servings Prep Time
6-8 people 10 minutes
Cook Time
30-35 minutes
Apricot Pistachio Tarte Tartin Mirabeau Wine
Apricot and Pistachio Tarte Tartin
Print Recipe
This apricot tarte tatin is not only beautiful it is easy to make.
Servings Prep Time
6-8 people 10 minutes
Cook Time
30-35 minutes
Servings Prep Time
6-8 people 10 minutes
Cook Time
30-35 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: people
Instructions
  1. Put the sugar in the pan (see note below regarding pan size and type) and set it over a medium heat.
  2. Cook until the sugar first melts and then caramelises and turns golden brown. Don’t stir the sugar but swirl it around the pan every now and then.
  3. Remove the caramel from the heat and stir in the butter with a wooden spoon. The caramel will be extremely hot so watch out for splashes and don’t dream of tasting it.
  4. Add chopped thyme.
  5. Continue stirring for 2–3 minutes as the caramel cools and thickens. It will look oily and separated to begin with, but will become smooth and toffee-like as you continue stirring.
  6. When the caramel is smooth, carefully arrange the apricots on top, cut-side down.
  7. Leave to cool for 20 minutes.
  8. Preheat the oven to 200C/400F/Gas 6.
  9. Unroll the puff pastry sheet on a lightly floured surface and use a rolling pin to roll it out until it is 2cm/1in wider.
  10. Place a dinner plate or 25cm/10in cake tin on the pastry and cut around it.
  11. Gently slide the pastry on top of the apricots and push down the sides with a round-bladed knife.
  12. Prick the surface to allow steam to escape.
  13. Bake the tarte tatin for 25 minutes until the pastry is golden-brown and the apricots are cooked.
  14. Remove the pan from the oven using an oven cloth to hold the handle of the pan – don’t forget – it will be very hot.
  15. Leave the tart to stand for a couple of minutes to allow it to settle, then loosen the edges and place a large serving plate or board on top of the frying pan.
  16. Very carefully, but quickly, turn it over, using a folded dry tea towel to help you hold it, and allow the tarte tatin to drop gently on to the serving plate.
  17. Serve warm with a dollop of mascarpone or vanilla ice cream if you fancy.
Recipe Notes

For caramelising the apricots, you need a small ovenproof frying pan with a base that measures about 20cm/8in in diameter.

Share this Recipe
Previous post

What's on? June Events in Provence 2018

Next post

Expat Living Experiences in Provence by Author Deborah Lawrenson

Mirabeau Wine

Mirabeau Wine

Stephen had been in the corporate world for 15 years and in August 2008 turned down a promotion that would have meant more money but also more stress, longer hours and less time with his young family. For many years the Cronks had been dreaming and talking about moving to France to make their own wine, but the moment never seemed quite right to make the big leap.

Soon after, a good redundancy offer seemed the perfect opportunity to turn the dream into reality and after selling their beloved house, they left the leafy suburbs of south-west London in August 2009. Their worldly possessions were packed up on the back of a truck and with barely a word of French between them, the family headed south to a small village called Cotignac, in the heart of Provence.

The Cronks spent a year getting their bearings, learning to live the provençal way, as Stephen was criss-crossing the country researching and finding the best vineyards to work with. The next step was setting up a small wine business with the principle objective of making a Provence rosé that would be regarded as one of the very best from the region, while building a brand that people would grow to love. In order to achieve this aim, they put together a highly experienced winemaking team and threw their heart and soul into the brand and innovative communications with their customers. Mirabeau is now being sold in more than 30 markets, has won medals and earned acclaim from some of the world’s toughest wine critics, but what really makes Stephen happiest is that their wines are an integral part of people having a great time together.

Read more about the Mirabeau Wine story here.

No Comment

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.