Mirabeau WinesPies & TartsRecipesTaste

A Twist on Lemon Tart – Tarte à l’Orange

The classic Tarte au Citron works beautifully with oranges instead of lemons to give a lush and softer edge to this light desert. I try and pick good quality, non treated oranges and have decided to reduce the juice a bit to get a more pronounced flavour. I made the sweet pastry myself, but a good quality “pure butter” supermarket version will do the trick and is less prone to failure. Read the original post here.

 

 

Tarte a l'orange Orange tart @MirabeauWine
Tarte a l’Orange
Print Recipe
While lemon tart always seems to be the norm, try this refreshing and creamy sensational orange version as it defines summer's best in one bite.
Servings Prep Time
8-10 people 35 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
50 minutes 30 minutes
Servings Prep Time
8-10 people 35 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
50 minutes 30 minutes
Tarte a l'orange Orange tart @MirabeauWine
Tarte a l’Orange
Print Recipe
While lemon tart always seems to be the norm, try this refreshing and creamy sensational orange version as it defines summer's best in one bite.
Servings Prep Time
8-10 people 35 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
50 minutes 30 minutes
Servings Prep Time
8-10 people 35 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
50 minutes 30 minutes
Ingredients
For the pastry:
For the filling:
Servings: people
Instructions
  1. If you are making the pastry yourself add the icing sugar and sifted flower to a bowl, then the cubes of cool butter.
  2. Crumble it through your fingers (using as little time and body heat as possible) until it’s well mixed.
  3. Then add the egg yolk and 3 tablespoons of milk (or water if you’re milk free) and form a ball.
  4. Wrap in cling film and put in the fridge for a minimum of 30 minutes.
  5. Switch the fan oven on to 160 degrees Celsius.
  6. In them meantime start the filling.
  7. Press the oranges and put the juice in a saucepan with the sugar and add some grated orange zest for extra intensity.
  8. Boil to reduce the liquid by about 1/3, this will concentrate the flavours (you should still have about 200ml left by the end).
  9. Let it cool.
  10. Put 3 whole eggs in a bowl and add 3 egg yolks and scramble to mix.
  11. Mix the eggs into the cooled juice and leave to stand for a few minutes.
  12. Pass through a fine sieve to remove orange bits, then add the cream and stir.
  13. Take the dough from the fridge. I use a cake tin with a removable bottom, but double up with parchment paper to be sure to get the tarte out in one piece.
  14. Cut a circle larger than the upper ring of the cake form and lay it out flat.
  15. I roll out the pastry on top of the parchment paper to roughly match this circle which I then transfer into the baking tin.
  16. Press down to the circumference of the bottom of the tin and arrange the edges to be relatively solid and even in terms of height and repair any breaks.
  17. Use parchment paper and baking beans to make sure the pastry bakes flatly and put it in oven for about 10 minutes.
  18. Remove the parchment and baking beans and bake for a further 10 minutes to make sure it’s crispy.
  19. Pour in the liquid and return to the oven for about 30 minutes, until it firms up but retains a nice wobble.
  20. Remove from the oven, let it cool a little, but it’s best eaten while it’s still a little warm.
    Tarte a l'orange Orange tart @MirabeauWine
Share this Recipe
Previous post

The 70th Cannes Film Festival 2017 and 75th Monaco F1 Grand Prix

Next post

Making the Connection Between Victor Hugo and the Joker

Mirabeau Wine

Mirabeau Wine

Stephen had been in the corporate world for 15 years and in August 2008 turned down a promotion that would have meant more money but also more stress, longer hours and less time with his young family. For many years the Cronks had been dreaming and talking about moving to France to make their own wine, but the moment never seemed quite right to make the big leap.

Soon after, a good redundancy offer seemed the perfect opportunity to turn the dream into reality and after selling their beloved house, they left the leafy suburbs of south-west London in August 2009. Their worldly possessions were packed up on the back of a truck and with barely a word of French between them, the family headed south to a small village called Cotignac, in the heart of Provence.

The Cronks spent a year getting their bearings, learning to live the provençal way, as Stephen was criss-crossing the country researching and finding the best vineyards to work with. The next step was setting up a small wine business with the principle objective of making a Provence rosé that would be regarded as one of the very best from the region, while building a brand that people would grow to love. In order to achieve this aim, they put together a highly experienced winemaking team and threw their heart and soul into the brand and innovative communications with their customers. Mirabeau is now being sold in more than 30 markets, has won medals and earned acclaim from some of the world’s toughest wine critics, but what really makes Stephen happiest is that their wines are an integral part of people having a great time together.

Read more about the Mirabeau Wine story here.

No Comment

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *