Lunchtime MealsProvencal RecipesTaste: Food & Drink

Provencal Savoury Classic Pissaladière Tart

This is no ordinary onion tart a pissaladière is almost an art form in Provence the key is in the dough and slow cooking the onions to just the right texture. The Provence Gourmet shares his recipe for a classic street food from Nice. If you are interested in cooking classes and learning some traditional Provencal meals contact Gilles (Provence Gourmet) to find out about his classes.

Image Credits: All photos were provided by and published with the permission of Provence Gourmet

Pissaladière Tart Provence Recipes Cooking Classes @ProvenceCook
Pissaladière tart
Print Recipe
Servings
6 People
Servings
6 People
Pissaladière Tart Provence Recipes Cooking Classes @ProvenceCook
Pissaladière tart
Print Recipe
Servings
6 People
Servings
6 People
Ingredients
Servings: People
Instructions
To Make the Dough
  1. Preheat your oven 180c° (350F°)
  2. Heat up 12cl (1/2 cup) of water and when boiling add 12cl (1/2 cup) of sunflower oil. When boiling again add into a bowl with the flour and a pinch of salt.
  3. Mix it all and shape your dough into a ball
  4. In a large baking sheet, spread an even layer of dough
  5. Put in the oven for 20 minutes
  6. Remove and allow to cool
To Prepare the Onions
  1. Meanwhile chop your onions and place in a heavy frying pan, with a glass water. Heat onions on a medium heat.
  2. Add olive oil, pepper and only a little salt
  3. Cooked the onions that way at least for an hour always making sure there still is a little water in the pan
  4. Near the end (when the onions are very tender) let all the water steam off and add a glass of white wine
  5. Let the wine steam off and layer your onions on the dough
  6. Arrange the anchovy’s filets and the olives on top of the onions. Add a few drops of olive oil and put the tart back in the oven for 12 minutes.
  7. Remove from the oven and allow to cool. Serve it barely warm with a Mache green salad.
Recipe Notes

The base of a pissaladière is similar to an Italian focaccia. The onions are cooked slowly until they are essentially confit and practically melting.

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Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

With her camera and laptop close at hand, Carolyne has traded in her business suits for the world of freelance writing and blogging. Her first airplane ride was at six-months old, her introduction to the exciting world of travel.

While in Provence, Carolyne can be found hiking with friends, riding the hills around the Alpilles or tackling Mont Ventoux. Her attachment to the region resonates in Perfectly Provence this digital magazine that she launched in 2014. This website is an opportunity to explore the best of the Mediterranean lifestyle (food & wine, places to stay, expat stories, books on the region, travel tips, real estate tips and more), through our contributors' articles.

Carolyne writes a food and travel blog Ginger and Nutmeg. Carolyne’s freelance articles can be found in Global Living Magazine, Avenue Magazine and City Palate (Published Travel Articles).

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