DessertMirabeau WinesPies & TartsTaste: Food & Drink

Individual French-Style Apple Tarts

France is considered the home of perfect, round fruit tarts, and when autumn comes you simply cannot avoid the traditional tarte aux pommes (apple tart). This the kind of classic French dessert you can find in almost every bakery, but according to Sophie Bellard of Mirabeau Wine, it is never as good as the one your grandmother makes.

French-Style Apple Tarts
French-Style Apple Tarts
The smell of apple tarts baking in your kitchen is a temptation enough, but these individual pastries in the pretty flower pattern... Well, it takes a lot of willpower to resist. And, these individual tarts are delicious warm or cold, with a glass of our lovely rosé Pure!
French-Style Apple Tarts
French-Style Apple Tarts
The smell of apple tarts baking in your kitchen is a temptation enough, but these individual pastries in the pretty flower pattern... Well, it takes a lot of willpower to resist. And, these individual tarts are delicious warm or cold, with a glass of our lovely rosé Pure!
Servings Prep Time
4tarts 20minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
1hour 1+hour (or overnight)
Servings Prep Time
4tarts 20minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
1hour 1+hour (or overnight)
Ingredients
For the Shortcrust Pastry:
For the Filling:
Instructions
Prepare the Shortcrust Pastry:
  1. Mix together butter, icing sugar, ground almonds, salt and flour.
  2. Incorporate egg and vanilla extract. Mix until homogeneous (if you own a stand mixer, we recommend using the paddle attachment, works like a charm!).
  3. Flatten roughly between two sheets of parchment paper and refrigerate for at least 1 hour (or overnight).
  4. Preheat the oven to 175°C (350F).
  5. Roll the pastry and line 4 individual tart tins (you can freeze the leftover pastry).
  6. Blind-bake for 10 minutes.
  7. Brush the bottom of the tart crust with the lightly beaten egg white, and blind-bake for 10 minutes.
  8. Remove from the oven and increase the temperature to 180°C (356F).
Assemble the Tarts:
  1. Spoon a thin layer of apple compote on the bottom of each tart crust.
  2. Core the apples then cut into quarters. Cut the apples into very thin half-moon shapes using a mandoline.
  3. Arrange the apple slices into a flower on each tart: place the slices one by one, each one slightly overlapping the one before.
  4. Start on the outside and work your way to the middle.
  5. Sprinkle with icing sugar, then a bit of brown sugar.
  6. Bake for about 45 minutes.
Recipe Notes

Tip: you can also sprinkle some cinnamon on top of the apples for extra flavour, right after sprinkling the sugar

Other French Desserts with Apples:

Apple cake so good you can eat it for breakfast.

Panade aux Pommes is apple pie with a Provencal twist.

Homemade apple beignet with caramel ice cream recipe.

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Mirabeau Wine

Mirabeau Wine

Stephen had been in the corporate world for 15 years and in August 2008 turned down a promotion that would have meant more money but also more stress, longer hours and less time with his young family. For many years the Cronks had been dreaming and talking about moving to France to make their own wine, but the moment never seemed quite right to make the big leap.

Soon after, a good redundancy offer seemed the perfect opportunity to turn the dream into reality and after selling their beloved house, they left the leafy suburbs of south-west London in August 2009. Their worldly possessions were packed up on the back of a truck and with barely a word of French between them, the family headed south to a small village called Cotignac, in the heart of Provence.

The Cronks spent a year getting their bearings, learning to live the provençal way, as Stephen was criss-crossing the country researching and finding the best vineyards to work with. The next step was setting up a small wine business with the principle objective of making a Provence rosé that would be regarded as one of the very best from the region, while building a brand that people would grow to love. In order to achieve this aim, they put together a highly experienced winemaking team and threw their heart and soul into the brand and innovative communications with their customers. Mirabeau is now being sold in more than 30 markets, has won medals and earned acclaim from some of the world’s toughest wine critics, but what really makes Stephen happiest is that their wines are an integral part of people having a great time together.

Read more about the Mirabeau Wine story here.

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