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Michelin Star Restaurants in Provence 2022

The PACA region scored high in the Michelin 2022 rating of French restaurants, revealed during a star-studded ceremony held in Cognac on March 23rd. There are now some 90 restaurants boasting at least one star in Michelin in Provence, which, revered or detested, is the granddaddy of restaurant guides. Four restaurants in France’s southeast stepped up to one-star status, and two others attained two stars; in one of the evening’s big surprises, the ultimate three-star rating was awarded to Dimitri Droisneau, chef of the Villa Madie overlooking the blue waves of the Mediterranean from Cassis.

Michelin Star Restaurants

The first Guide Michelin appeared in 1900 when bicycles greatly outnumbered cars on the French roads. It was a brilliant marketing plan by André and Édouard Michelin, brothers and owners of the tire manufacturing company. Their idea was to increase demand for cars, specifically tires, by encouraging French drivers to get out on the road and drive, maybe to a restaurant or hotel. At first, the guidebook was free, and it included valuable tips for car travel, including mechanics, gas stations and maps.

In 1920, the Michelin Guide cost seven francs, and the concept of awarding stars to restaurants began in 1926. The ranking system of one, two, or three stars was established in 1936 and remains as follows:

1 Star: A very good restaurant in its category. (Une très bonne table dans sa catégorie)
2 Stars: Excellent cooking, worth a detour. (Table excellente, mérite un détour)
3 Stars: Exceptional cuisine, worth a special journey. (Une des meilleures tables, vaut le voyage).

Bib Gourmand

Acknowledging that many restaurants serve “Exceptionally good food at moderate prices,” the company began publishing the Bib Gourmand in 1955. There are 49 Bib Gourmand restaurants in Provence.

Assiette Michelin

This designation indicates a cuisine of quality. This classification can include all kinds of establishments. Currently, there are 265 Assiette MICHELIN restaurants in Provence.

Étoile Verte

A green star is for restaurants that aim to support biodiversity and respect for the environment through their choice of sustainable products. These stars are often awarded to Michelin star restaurants in addition to their star distinctions. Many of these restaurants have kitchen gardens.

Michelin Stars In Provence

Eze: No other restaurant on the French Riviera can compete with the romantic ambience of La Chevre d’Or. Located on a high cliff in the medieval town of Eze, Chef Arnaud Faye draws inspiration from the rocky foothills of Mercantour to the crystal-clear waters of the Mediterranean Sea. Creating authentic dishes, like the raw and cooked figs infused with marigold, magnifies such a unique setting’s contrasts.

Marseille: Gérald Passedat is the third generation of his family to place his golden tongs in the business. He officially took over the hotel and restaurant in 2000 from his father, Jean-Paul, who was both a hotelier and opera singer. Building on his father’s legacy (2 Michelin stars), Gérald Passedat’s kitchen achieved a 3rd Michelin Star in 2008. The restaurant at le Petit Nice is the perfect place to go for a special occasion. The cantilevered dining room contributes to the impression that you are floating on blue water through your divine meal. The table service at le Petit Nice is nothing short of perfection. Everything on the menu provides a gastronomic experience.

Menton: Hungry for gorgeous Mediterranean sites? Mirazur has three Michelin stars and unrivalled views of the French Riviera with the mountains as a backdrop. Chef Mauro Colagreco draws inspiration from nature, creating some tasty vegetables. His San Remo prawns infused with delicate rose alone, or the quinoa risotto topped with woodland mushrooms and parmesan cream, could be why the Mirazur earned its third Michelin star.

Monte Carlo: Joel Robuchon at the Hotel Metropole in Monte Carlo. A mural from Karl Lagerfeld, cocktail-infused dinners, and alfresco lunches- are three things you’ll find at chef Joel Robuchon’s restaurant. Of course, food lovers can’t stop raving about the French haute cuisine on the menus, perhaps the most popular being Mediterranean dishes like the Octopus Salad and desserts from the famed trolley. Visitors can also look forward to a front-row view of parts of the legendary Grand Prix circuit, provided the time is right. Read more about this luxury hotel here.

Nice:

Restaurant JAN is where French and South African cuisine play in Chef Jan Hendrik’s capable hands. After tasting melktert and biltong, you’ll understand why this dining room earned its first Michelin star in 2016, only three years after opening. Every dish is a work of art and an exciting journey for your taste buds at this restaurant. One where you don’t have to pick just one meal, Jan offers a tasting menu paired with custom white wines of Chenin Blanc, Roussanne, or Verdelho and reds of Shiraz, Mourvèdre, or Grenache. You won’t be disappointed.

Chef Jean-Denis Rieubland’s restaurant artfully combines old-fashioned elegance, exceptional service, and modern culinary innovation. Found on the ground floor of Hôtel Negresco, the pink regency dining room with glittering chandeliers offers the perfect setting to experience French cuisine right in the epicentre of Nice. You’ll love the contemporary twist on classic French and Mediterranean dishes. An in-house sommelier personally chooses a wine to accompany each six-course meal. If you’re looking for something different, the chef’s ‘Surprise Menu’ is up to the challenge.

Keep reading for more top-quality restaurants on the French Riviera and beyond.

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Lynne Alderson

Lynne Alderson

Aixcentric was set up by Lynne Alderson three years ago as a channel to send out info on events taking place around Aix as well as news, relevant books, the latest films, new shops and of course where to eat locally. Why?

According, to Lynne:

"It came about out of frustration with the lack of communication in the town. Posters would suddenly go up about an event that week. No prewarning. I had difficulty too in finding information from many of the tourist offices. Things are slowly getting better and there is sometimes information in English. Hopefully by keeping an eagle eye on the local press and talking with contacts in town, I can publicize fun things that people would otherwise miss. It's a ragbag of info that I come across on my travels. I've published nearly 600 posts now and have lots of followers so hopefully, it is fulfilling its role of helping people, residents and visitors alike, get the most of their time in Aix."

For what is going on in Aix-en-Provence, Lynne has you covered at Aixcentric

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