BreadsProvencal RecipesTaste: Food & DrinkViktorija Todorovska

Fougasse the Provencal Version of Italy’s Focaccia

This recipe for Fougasse with Tomatoes, Olives, and Peppers is a hearty appetizer that your guests will love. Fougasse is a flat bread that you find in both sweet and savoury versions. According to Wikipedia, “Fougasse was traditionally used to assess the temperature of a wood fired oven. The time it would take to bake gives an idea of the oven temperature and whether the rest of the bread can be loaded.”

The ingredients for fougasse and focaccia dough are mostly the same. However, the real difference is during the baking stage. Before baking, the fougasse dough is scored with a knife to create openings, once baked the finished product looks like a leaf or perhaps (to some) a shaft of wheat. Fougasse is baked on a hot stone (like a pizza stone), which traditionally was the hearth, whereas focaccia cooks in a deep, oiled pan. So this Provencal bread – fougasse – ends up being crispier than it’s Italian “cousin.”

This recipe is one of many from this cookbook, Provence Food and Wine: The Art of Living with photos by François Millo.

Fougasse Tomatoes Olives Peppers @SipTasteShare
Fougasse with Tomatoes, Olives, and Peppers
Print Recipe
This fougasse is rich and savory, almost a meal in and of itself. Pair with a more structured, but dry rosé for a perfect aperitif.
Servings Prep Time
8 people 45 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 minutes 1 1/2 hours
Servings Prep Time
8 people 45 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 minutes 1 1/2 hours
Fougasse Tomatoes Olives Peppers @SipTasteShare
Fougasse with Tomatoes, Olives, and Peppers
Print Recipe
This fougasse is rich and savory, almost a meal in and of itself. Pair with a more structured, but dry rosé for a perfect aperitif.
Servings Prep Time
8 people 45 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 minutes 1 1/2 hours
Servings Prep Time
8 people 45 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 minutes 1 1/2 hours
Ingredients
For the Dough:
For the Filling:
Servings: people
Instructions
Prepare the Dough:
  1. In a large bowl, combine the flour and salt.
  2. In a cup dissolve the yeast in the water. Add the sugar, stir, and let sit for 5-7 minutes, until the yeast starts to bubble.
  3. Add to the flour, stir and add the olive oil.
  4. Mix well to combine. If the dough is too wet, add more flour. The dough should not be sticky.
  5. Turn out the dough onto a lightly floured surface and knead until smooth, 8-10 minutes.
  6. Form the dough into a ball, place in a large, lightly-oiled bowl, cover with a damp kitchen towel and let rise in a draft-free warm place for 1 to 1 ½ hours, until double in size.
Prepare the Filling:
  1. In a medium (4- to 5-quart [3.8- to 4.7-L]) pan, warm up 2 tablespoons of the olive oil.
  2. Add the peppers and a sprinkling of salt and cook for 5-7 minutes, until the peppers soften.
  3. In another medium (4- to 5-quart [3.8- to 4.7-L]) pan, warm up the remaining 3 tablespoons olive oil over medium heat.
  4. Add the onions and ½ teaspoon salt and cook for 8-10 minutes, until the onions are translucent. Set aside.
  5. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.
  6. Punch down dough and halve.
  7. Pat each half into an oval about 1/4 inch thick.
  8. Transfer one oval to a lightly oiled large baking sheet. Layer with the tomatoes, onions and olives.
  9. Cover with the second oval and press the edges to close the fougasse.
  10. Score the top diagonally.
  11. Layer the peppers on top, alternating the three colors for visual appeal.
  12. Sprinkle with sea salt and the herbs.
  13. Bake for 40-45 minutes, until the fougasse is golden.
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Viktorija Todorovska

Viktorija Todorovska

A Mediterranean soul, Viktorija Todorovska loves nothing better than exploring the foods, wines, and trails of this sunny region, savoring life. Currently living in Nice, she immerses herself in the art of living

Cookbook author, teacher, and sommelier, Viktorija is passionate about sharing her knowledge of food and wine with the world. She writes, teaches classes and guides travelers through her favorite towns and villages. Find out more about Viktorija on her website Sip Taste Share.

Check out Viktorija’s books on Provence:

Provence Food and Wine: The Art of Living
and
Nice Cuisine and the Art of Living

Don't forget to follow Viktorija on social media (links below).

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