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For a Hearty Winter Stew try Grillade Saint Gilloise

A slow-cooked meat stew, Grillade Saint-Gilloise, might be the perfect winter recipe. A hearty meat dish, this recipe typically includes beef or bull (taureau) chuck, onions, anchovy fillets, and capers. Sometimes called agrillade, aigriade, in Arles broufade, in Provencal broufado.  The key to this recipe is the long marinating time. We recommend at least overnight.

This traditional dish from the Gard has its start as a humble dish of the Rhône River mariners. Prepared in advance, they could eat this hearty stew on their boats once they arrived in St Gilles. Our recipe for Grillade Saint-Gilloise follows below.

Rhone River Boats

With a population of 13,600, Saint Gilles is a medium-sized town in the Petit Camargue located between Arles and Nîmes. Founded by Saint Giles in the 7th-century, the town’s Abbey was a stopping point along the Via Tolosana part of the Camino de Compostela that leads from Arles to Santiago via Toulouse before crossing the Pyrenees. In 1998, UNESCO added the church with its exquisite Romanesque portal to the list of World Heritage Sites.

Also, watch our website for details on our Week in Seville, Spain culinary experiences.

Hearty Winter Stew Grillade Aigriada Saint Gilloise

Agriade Saint-Gilloise

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Start this recipe the day before as there is no way to rush the cooking process. Stewed for a long time, similar to a Provencal daube, Agriade Saint-Gilloise is even better when reheated.
Prep Time 30 mins
Cook Time 4 hrs
Resting Time 10 hrs
Total Time 14 hrs 30 mins
Course Main Course
Cuisine French, Provencal
Servings 6 people

Ingredients
  

  • 3 lbs Beef Cheeks
  • 2 medium Onions
  • 4 Garlic Cloves
  • 10 Anchovies (in oil)
  • 3 tbsp Capers
  • 1 handful Parsley
  • 1/2 bottle of White Wine
  • 3 tbsp Olive Oil

Instructions
 

The day before serving:

  • Peel and chop onion and garlic, chop capers, anchovies and parsley. Not too small. Reserve
  • Slice the meat into roughly half-inch thick pieces. Set aside and reserve.
  • Mix all the ingredients and add salt and pepper. Keep the olive oil for the next day. Reserve in the fridge overnight.

The day you serve the dish:

  • Five (5) hours before serving, in a cast-iron casserole, add olive oil and your meat preparation, heat on the stove for 10 minutes. Cover and cook in the oven at 120ºC (300ºF) for 3 to 4 hours. Allow the dish to rest for 1 hour before serving.
  • Serve with black Camargue rice or boiled potatoes

Notes

You will also hear this recipe be called Aigriada - aigre is the French word for sour - but no worries this is not a sour dish at all!
Keyword Beef, Slow-Cooked, Stew, Taureau
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

Provencal Winter Dishes

Lamb Stew with Root Vegetables (Navarin d’Agneau)
Local free-range lamb is easy to find in Provence, so there are many typical dishes that you will find on menus. Navarin d’Agneau is a traditional slow-cooked stew made with root vegetables.
Check out this recipe
Lamb Stew Navarin d’Agneau
Quick Coq au Vin
The longest part of this recipe is cooking the chicken, which will be roughly 60 minutes on simmer. Enjoy some easy French cuisine for dinner tonight.
Check out this recipe
Quick Coq au Vin
Lentils and Sausage with Sweet Paprika Soup
This soup is a filling bowl of delicious flavours. It is easy to prepare, and can definitely be made in advance. Serve with fresh bread and a red wine from Provence.
Check out this recipe
Lentil Sausage Sweet Paprika Soup Cook'n with Class
Pot au Feu
Traditionally the stew is served in 2 services. Meat and vegetables first, then the broth and the bread...
Pot au Feu Casserole Cook'n with Class

French Cast Iron Casseroles:

If you already have a cast iron casserole that will work perfectly well for this recipe. However, if you do not have one consider investing in a heavy casserole for this recipe and some of the others listed above. These pots are available in a rainbow of colours and will last your lifetime.

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Let’s Eat the World - Cook’n With Class Experiences

Let’s Eat the World - Cook’n With Class Experiences

Cook’n With Class has been in operation since 2007 in Paris offering French cooking classes (in English), to visiting tourists and locals interested in learning about the art of French cuisine from baking, French desserts, and French market classes that include market tours.

Chef Eric Fraudeau, who worked both in France and internationally (in Mexico, the United States, and Canada), along with his wife Yetunde Oshodi-Fraudeau, opened a second cooking school in southern France (Cook’n With Class Uzes) in 2015 focused on Mediterranean and Provencal Cuisine with hands-on French market classes and their very popular culinary holiday tour - The Week in Uzès. 2020 saw the birth of their latest brand which has since replaced their southern French cooking school - Let’s Eat The World - Cook’n With Class Experiences. Let’s Eat The World continues the tradition of Cook’n With Class to offer quality culinary experiences with vacation tours, masterclass workshops, and now, online cooking classes to bring French, Mediterranean, and Spanish cuisine directly into the homes of food and travel enthusiasts.

Join Chef Eric for a Week in Uzes, a Week in Paris, & coming soon, a Week in Seville for food and wine adventures you will not soon forget. And for those of you who can’t travel or who want to bring the taste of travel into your home kitchen, be sure to check out their online cooking classes.

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