Mirabeau WinesTaste: Food & DrinkWines and Spirits of Provence

Why blending is so key in Rosé winemaking

People are often surprised that most wines are blends, and even more surprised that even single-grape variety bottles are blends from different tanks. In Provence, it’s the law of our appellation that wines are blends from the local varieties like Grenache, Syrah, Cinsault and Carignan. A good …Continue reading here to learn how Mirabeau Wine selects the right combinations to craft their two rosé wines – Pure and Classic.


Wine Tasting Essentials:

Wine evaluation uses the following four categories:
1) Appearance
2) Aroma
3) Taste
4) Finish

When tasting, you will report your findings and determine the specific properties of the wine. A “tasting flight” involves tasting many wines at one time.

Tastings can be vertical or horizontal. In a vertical tasting, the samples compared have the same type of wine from the same winery but have different vintages. On the other hand, in a horizontal tasting, you compare wines from different producers but with the same vintage. You can determine the differences in the styles of the wineries by keeping the wine type and region the same on all wines.

You should also consider that for you to have a fair evaluation of a wine, you should try a blind tasting. In a blind tasting, you will taste and examine the wine without seeing its bottle shape or label. A server can also put the wine in the black glass to hide its colour. Your judgment can be affected by knowing some of the characteristics of the wine, such as price, place of origin, colour, reputation, etc. Blind tastings can avoid bias arising from colour, price, and geographic origin.

Continue reading here: How Do You Perform Wine Tasting?

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Mirabeau Wine

Mirabeau Wine

Stephen had been in the corporate world for 15 years and in August 2008 turned down a promotion that would have meant more money but also more stress, longer hours and less time with his young family. For many years the Cronks had been dreaming and talking about moving to France to make their own wine, but the moment never seemed quite right to make the big leap.

Soon after, a good redundancy offer seemed the perfect opportunity to turn the dream into reality and after selling their beloved house, they left the leafy suburbs of south-west London in August 2009. Their worldly possessions were packed up on the back of a truck and with barely a word of French between them, the family headed south to a small village called Cotignac, in the heart of Provence.

The Cronks spent a year getting their bearings, learning to live the provençal way, as Stephen was criss-crossing the country researching and finding the best vineyards to work with. The next step was setting up a small wine business with the principle objective of making a Provence rosé that would be regarded as one of the very best from the region, while building a brand that people would grow to love. In order to achieve this aim, they put together a highly experienced winemaking team and threw their heart and soul into the brand and innovative communications with their customers. Mirabeau is now being sold in more than 30 markets, has won medals and earned acclaim from some of the world’s toughest wine critics, but what really makes Stephen happiest is that their wines are an integral part of people having a great time together.

Read more about the Mirabeau Wine story here.

2 Comments

  1. David
    July 24, 2016 at 5:24 pm — Reply

    Nice to read about the art of blending, a subject I don’t know well! Although I love Mirabeau wines.

    • CKAdmin
      July 26, 2016 at 8:07 am — Reply

      Thanks David we agree – we love @Mirabeauwine.

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