DessertFlans, Puddings & OtherProvencal RecipesTaste: Food & Drink

Elizabeth Bard’s Cherry Clafoutis

This sweet summer recipe comes from Elizabeth Bard’s latest book Picnic in Provence: A memoir with Recipes. The recipe for this delicious cherry dessert is published with the author’s permission.Cherries #Provence

Cherry Clafoutis Clafoutis aux Cerises #Dessert #Cherries
Cherry Clafouti - Clafoutis aux Cerises
Print Recipe
Clafouti is a homey dessert, a wobbly set custard chock-full of summer’s first cherries. What it lacks in elegance, it makes up for in comfort and sheer de- liciousness, perfect for brunch among friends. I’ve been fiddling with clafouti recipes for many years. Jean’s had too much flour for my taste, more like a Far Breton. This recipe is adapted from Les Clafoutis de Christophe by Christophe Felder (Éditions Minerva, 2001). Many traditional clafoutis use unpitted cher- ries, to get the bitter almond flavor from the pits, but if you don’t want to pay for your guests’ dental work, I suggest you pit the cherries and add some amaretto instead!
Servings
6-8 People
Servings
6-8 People
Cherry Clafoutis Clafoutis aux Cerises #Dessert #Cherries
Cherry Clafouti - Clafoutis aux Cerises
Print Recipe
Clafouti is a homey dessert, a wobbly set custard chock-full of summer’s first cherries. What it lacks in elegance, it makes up for in comfort and sheer de- liciousness, perfect for brunch among friends. I’ve been fiddling with clafouti recipes for many years. Jean’s had too much flour for my taste, more like a Far Breton. This recipe is adapted from Les Clafoutis de Christophe by Christophe Felder (Éditions Minerva, 2001). Many traditional clafoutis use unpitted cher- ries, to get the bitter almond flavor from the pits, but if you don’t want to pay for your guests’ dental work, I suggest you pit the cherries and add some amaretto instead!
Servings
6-8 People
Servings
6-8 People
Ingredients
Servings: People
Instructions
  1. Preheat your oven to 400°F.
  2. In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together sugar, eggs, and egg yolks until a light lemon yellow. Add flour; whisk to combine. Pour in milk, cream, and amaretto, whisking just to combine — this is like pan- cake batter; once you add the flour, you don’t want to overwork it.
  3. Butter and sugar a 10-inch ceramic tart mold (I sometimes skip this step and just line the dish with a big sheet of parchment paper).
  4. Put the cherries in the bottom of the mold. Give the batter a final stir and pour it in. Bake on the middle rack of the oven for 50 to 55 minutes, until well browned and fully set in the middle. Serve slightly warm or at room temperature (though I never say no to the leftovers straight from the fridge the next morning).
Recipe Notes

Tip: You can make clafouti with any kind of seasonal fruit that won’t give off too much water; blackberries and apricots immediately come to mind.

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Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

With her camera and laptop close at hand, Carolyne has traded in her business suits for the world of freelance writing and blogging. Her first airplane ride was at six-months old, her introduction to the exciting world of travel.

While in Provence, Carolyne can be found hiking with friends, riding the hills around the Alpilles or tackling Mont Ventoux. Her attachment to the region resonates in Perfectly Provence this digital magazine that she launched in 2014. This website is an opportunity to explore the best of the Mediterranean lifestyle (food & wine, places to stay, expat stories, books on the region, travel tips, real estate tips and more), through our contributors' articles.

Carolyne writes a food and travel blog Ginger and Nutmeg. Carolyne’s freelance articles can be found in Global Living Magazine, Avenue Magazine and City Palate (Published Travel Articles).

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