David Scott AllenDessertPies & TartsProvencal RecipesTaste: Food & Drink

Double-Crust Rhubarb Pie

Rhubarb (rhubarbe) may not be something that jumps to mind as typically Provencal. However, it is actually fairly common to find this vegetable during the springtime months at local markets and some grocery stores. Perhaps bizarrely rhubarb is often used in fragrances. Personally, I prefer to make this tart and tingly, double-crust rhubarb pie over perfumed soap.

Enjoy!

 

Double-Crust Rhubarb Pie
Double-Crust Rhubarb Pie
Print Recipe
Homemade pie tastes better with homemade crust, but if you are short for time you can buy the pre-made version.
Servings Prep Time
8 slices 20 minutes
Cook Time
45 minutes
Servings Prep Time
8 slices 20 minutes
Cook Time
45 minutes
Double-Crust Rhubarb Pie
Double-Crust Rhubarb Pie
Print Recipe
Homemade pie tastes better with homemade crust, but if you are short for time you can buy the pre-made version.
Servings Prep Time
8 slices 20 minutes
Cook Time
45 minutes
Servings Prep Time
8 slices 20 minutes
Cook Time
45 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: slices
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 450°F (230°C).
  2. Trim the rhubarb and slice it into 1/2-inch thick slices. You should have at least 4 cups.
  3. Mix the rhubarb with the sugar, flour, and cinnamon. Set aside.
  4. Roll out the bottom crust and line a 9-inch pie plate.
  5. Fill with the rhubarb mixture, then cover with the top crust.
  6. Trim and fold over the edges, then crimp with your thumb and fingers, or using a fork.
  7. Cut several vent holes in the top, then brush with milk and sprinkle with finishing sugar, if desired.
  8. Bake 10 minutes, then reduce heat to 350°F and continue to bake for 35 minutes, or until top crust is brown and filling is bubbling.
Recipe Notes

Pie Crust for a Two-Crust Pie:

  • 2 1/3 cups flour
  • 14 tablespoons cold butter, cut into cubes
  • 7 tablespoons ice water, possibly more

Place the flour in a large mixing bowl. Add the cubes of butter and stir to coat them with flour.

Using your fingers, pinch the butter over and over until it is all in small pieces or flakes.

Sprinkle with half the water and, using a fork, toss it to evenly distribute.

Add the remaining water, tablespoon by tablespoon, tossing after each addition.

At this point, your dough should hold together when squeezed. If not, add a tablespoon or two of additional ice water.

Pull together into a ball and refrigerate for 30 minutes.

Divide the dough into two balls, one slightly larger than the other. The smaller one will be the top crust.

Please share this with friends and family.

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David Scott Allen

David Scott Allen

David Scott Allen is the author, photographer, and cook behind Cocoa & Lavender, a weekly food blog based in Tucson, Arizona. Passionate about travel, he especially enjoys eating traditional foods and learning local customs, whether in the United States or around the globe.

David's first trip to France took place when he was 14, and he returned as often as possible thereafter. However, it wasn't until his 50th birthday that he finally made it south to Provence. The beauty, history, charm, warmth, cuisine, and - of course - the rosé wines captured his heart. He shares his Provençal recipes here on Perfectly Provence, and his food and wine pairings monthly on the Provence WineZine.

David is a firm believer that sharing a meal with friends around the table is one of life's greatest pleasures. And if it happens to be in Provence, all the better!

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