Carolyne Kauser-AbbottDessertPies & TartsProvencal RecipesTaste: Food & Drink

Fig Tart with Marzipan

This recipe for a delicious fig tart comes from our friend Nito Carpita, a classically trained chef. The figs are baked in a sweet custard – just try to resist!

Nito and her husband David ran Mas Cornud for many years combining the activities of a B&B with a first class cooking school.  After two decades, they decided it was time to take life a little slower. You can read more about how an Egyptian born chef and a Montana banker end up in St Remy de Provence in this post — cooking with Provencal style.

 

Fig Tart with Marzipan #FigRecipes @PerfProvence
Fig Tart with Marzipan
Print Recipe
This tart is relatively easy to make and absolutely a crowd favourite.
Servings Prep Time
8 People 20 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
35-40 Minutes 10 Minutes
Servings Prep Time
8 People 20 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
35-40 Minutes 10 Minutes
Fig Tart with Marzipan #FigRecipes @PerfProvence
Fig Tart with Marzipan
Print Recipe
This tart is relatively easy to make and absolutely a crowd favourite.
Servings Prep Time
8 People 20 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
35-40 Minutes 10 Minutes
Servings Prep Time
8 People 20 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
35-40 Minutes 10 Minutes
Ingredients
Servings: People
Instructions
  1. Mix with a hand-held beater or food processor: almond powder, sugar, flour, butter, egg, egg white and vanilla extract. Mix until the batter becomes creamy.
  2. Pour batter into the baked tart shell and level with a spatula.
  3. Place figs cut side up in the creamy mixture, pressing them gently in two or three circles, leaving a small space between them.
  4. Dust the figs with powdered sugar.
  5. Bake in a preheated oven - @ 350F (180C) degrees - until the surface of the figs caramelizes and the batter puffs up. About 35-40 minutes.
  6. Remove from the oven, let the tart cool slightly in the pan before placing it on a rack to cool completely. Cut and serve.
Recipe Notes

Placing the figs cut side up helps prevent the pastry from becoming soggy. When figs are out of season this tart can be made with other stone fruit, such as apricots, peaches, nectarines or plums.

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Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

Carolyne Kauser-Abbott

With her camera and laptop close at hand, Carolyne has traded in her business suits for the world of freelance writing and blogging. Her first airplane ride at six months of age was her introduction to the exciting world of travel.

While in Provence, Carolyne can be found hiking with friends, riding the hills around the Alpilles or tackling Mont Ventoux. Her attachment to the region resonates in Perfectly Provence this digital magazine that she launched in 2014. This website is an opportunity to explore the best of the Mediterranean lifestyle (food & wine, places to stay, expat stories, books on the region, travel tips, real estate tips and more), through our contributors' articles.

Carolyne writes a food and travel blog Ginger and Nutmeg. Carolyne’s freelance articles can be found in Global Living Magazine, Avenue Magazine and City Palate (Published Travel Articles).

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