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Mushroom Season: Tarte aux Trompette de la Mort a Wild Mushroom Tart Recipe

“This is a recipe Didi and I made up (mostly Didi!) when given an enormous bag of freshly foraged Trompette de la Mort mushrooms. It’s wonderful as a starter, but could easily be a full meal when paired with a nice salad. Any mushrooms will do, but wild mushrooms do seem to really make this. If you can’t be bothered to make the béchamel, it’s fine without.” Read the rest of Paula’s A Table en Provence post here (recipe below).

Wild mushroom tart a version of this recipe with girolles:
Wild Mushroom Tart
Trompette de la Mort Tarte Wild Mushroom Tart
Wild Mushroom Tart - Tarte aux Trompette de la Mort
Print Recipe
This savoury tart is easy to make and you can use any mushroom mix that you find. The Trompette de la Mort is impressive (and tasty), but girolles or chanterelles work just fine too.
Servings Prep Time
3-4 People 15-20 minutes
Cook Time
15 minutes
Servings Prep Time
3-4 People 15-20 minutes
Cook Time
15 minutes
Trompette de la Mort Tarte Wild Mushroom Tart
Wild Mushroom Tart - Tarte aux Trompette de la Mort
Print Recipe
This savoury tart is easy to make and you can use any mushroom mix that you find. The Trompette de la Mort is impressive (and tasty), but girolles or chanterelles work just fine too.
Servings Prep Time
3-4 People 15-20 minutes
Cook Time
15 minutes
Servings Prep Time
3-4 People 15-20 minutes
Cook Time
15 minutes
Ingredients
Filling and Pastry:
Béchamel:
Servings: People
Instructions
For the béchamel:
  1. Make the roux: melt the butter in a heavy-bottomed saucepan.
  2. Stir in the flour and cook, stirring constantly, until the paste cooks and bubbles a bit, but don't let it brown—about 2 minutes. It should smell like shortbread cookies when it’s ready.
  3. Add the milk, bit at a time to avoid clumps. If you have clumps, use a whisk to work them through.
  4. Continue to stir as the sauce thickens.
  5. Bring it to a boil.
  6. Add salt, nutmeg and pepper to taste, lower the heat and cook, stirring for 2 to 3 minutes more.
  7. Remove from the heat. To cool this sauce for later use, cover it with parchment paper or saran wrap to prevent a skin from forming.
  8. If you want to add cheese: Take off the heat and stir in 1/2 cup grated cheese (for this I suggest parmesan, grano padano, gruyère or a nice comté). If the cheese isn’t completely melted, put back on a low heat until fully melted.
  9. Clean the mushrooms thoroughly from dirt, twigs, leaves etc. If mushrooms are very large, give them a rough chop.
    Trompette de la Mort Mushrooms
  10. Put a good couple tablespoons of olive oil or butter (or both) in a sautée pan on medium to high heat.
  11. Once warmed, add the mushrooms (they should sizzle).
  12. Add salt and pepper and cook until most of the water has evaporated.
  13. Add the garlic and cook for a few minutes.
  14. Then add the wine and cook until all liquid has evaporated.
  15. Turn down heat and add crème fraîche.
  16. Add the fresh herbs at the end and adjust the seasoning. You can use any herbs you like, but I’ve had rave reviews about the tarragon!
For the Pastry:
  1. The quickest is to use store bought puff pastry here, and it is delicious. If you do, place it in a tart pan, brush with olive oil, and dock the pastry with a fork. Bake according to package instructions, but likely for only 10-15 is all you need. You want to pre-bake it completely.
Assembly and finish:
  1. Once the pastry is cooked, add a layer of béchamel to the bottom. Place mushroom mixture on top. Put back in the oven until thoroughly warmed, about 10 minutes. Enjoy!
Recipe Notes

Although, store-bought pastry works fine for this recipe it would also be good with a basic tarte/quiche pastry if you want to keep it homemade. You can find a basic recipe here.

Note: How hot should the milk be for the béchamel? This is an ongoing argument. Many recipes insist the milk be warm. However, when studying at the Cordon Bleu they insisted it be cold. They said, “never add hot to hot, or cold to cold. It should be one hot, one cold’. As your roux will be hot, no need to warm the milk. I’ve done it a million times and never warmed the milk. It works just fine.

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Paula Kane

Paula Kane

From a background in advertising and design, Paula Kane has forged a career that combines her love of good food and wine with her expertise in marketing to produce highly successful culinary events across Canada. Paula first travelled to France 20 years ago and has been returning ever since. She received a scholarship from the James Beard Foundation to attend Le Cordon Bleu, Paris, from which she was graduated in 2009. She has completed the International Sommelier Guild Wine Fundamentals and recently, the Hautes Etudes du Goût program in gastronomy from which she was awarded a Masters degree from the University of Reims in Champagne, France. For the past ten years, Paula has spent part of her year in the Vaucluse where she cycles, cooks, drinks wine, explores and shares her discoveries with others on her website A Table en Provence.

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