Expat LivingJemma - French Lessons

How to Survive the French Car Pound

Contributor blog post by Jemma:

French Lessons welcomes 2017’s guest contributor: Rachael, our friend and dinner party guest whose evening ended badly. She’d only bid us ‘bonsoir’ when she promptly returned to Bellevue’s gate. A call to the police confirmed that yes, indeed, her car had been towed to Antibes’ pound.

Rachael drove our car home that night with plans to deal with her own, impounded vehicle the following morning.

Here Rachael shares her experience retrieving her car from the local fourrière.   It is one bit of cultural instruction that French Lessons is delighted to learn secondhand. 

…Continue reading here for details on Rachael’s story how she was able to extricate (finally) her car from the French car pound. Why you need a copy of your Carte Grise. And how she managed to keep her heart rate at 110 beats per minutes despite a bureaucratic nightmare. The last part might be the biggest feat.

Via:: French Lessons

      

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Jemma Antibes

Jemma Antibes

Jemma was born and raised in the US Midwest. A banker by trade, she slogged away at a Swiss investment bank in the UK and South Africa before moving – for decent spaces of time, anyway – to the South of France. At a similar stage, she also moved to the right side of her brain as a writer. She has published articles in Maclean’s, SuperYacht World, and various travel and university presses.

At this point Jemma lives mostly in Canada, but she spends the whole of every summer in the Côte d’Azur town of Antibes, from where she writes her blog French Lessons. Now (rather unbelievably) in its ninth year, the site is a summertime gift to readers, each note aiming to capture a snapshot of the remarkable, real life along the French Riviera. Jemma still holds her MBA from the University of Chicago, though, and for this reason she apologises if France’s quirky economic system captivates her attentions more frequently than perhaps it ought.

When not engrossed in things French, she is – not in any particular order – taking a stab at writing a book, making music, performing motherly duties, expanding education in bits of Africa, promoting Canadian writing, and travelling off-the-beaten-track: 84 countries, and counting.

You can reach Jemma through her blog site at French Lessons.

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